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Allsp -dmi biotic list +refc sources current.xls

Taxonomic Summary
Plant and animal groups comprise a diverse biotic assemblage in northwest Alberta. It is difficult yet
to estimate total species richness as scientists currently have incomplete taxonomic descriptions of arthropods,
oligochaetes (segmented worms), round worms, spiders, ticks, mites, lichens, and fungi. However, most taxonomists
agree that total biotic richness would be many multiples of the ~1000 species that are described for northwest
Alberta.
The sections on arthropods, gastropods and fungi provides a very small start-point in describing the taxonomic richness of these species groups in the boreal forests of Alberta. Ranking of taxa by species richness ispresented in the taxa summary below.
Among plant species in northwest Alberta, more vascular plants have been taxonomically described than non-vascular plants (lichens, liverworts, etc.).
taxonomically dominant to other classes (mammals, amphibians, reptiles), though many bird species occur onlyseasonally in the boreal forest biome of northwest Alberta.
1999 DFMP
2006 DFMP 2007 DFMP
2008 Up-date High-risk*** Component
Total Species Total Species Total Species Total Species Annual Reviews Biotic Group
* - Arthropod, gastropod & fungi species lists specific to NW Alberta were not available 1999.
Current lists are a start-point derived from local research project observations including EMEND, and newpublished sources since 1999 with range map references.
** -species diversity increases reflect additional information on locally occurring species through research project observations (esp EMEND), various published sources and DMI staff observations.
*** “High-risk species” (DMI Defn) -endangered or threatened (at-risk), may-be-at-risk, sensitive, vulnerable,
special concern, range-isolated or rare (S1+ S2 only)
….international, federal & provincial agencies Arthropods of Northwest Alberta*
* Note: NW Alberta inventory is incomplete. This list represents a start-point of some locally collected data Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Brachychthonius nr. berlesei Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Neoliochthonius nr. occultus Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Poecilochthonius nr. spiciger Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Acariformes Brachychthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Suctobelbella nr. acutidens Acariformes Trhypochthoniidae Oribatid -soil mite Antherophagus ochraceus Melsheimer Cryptophagus acutangulus Gyllenhal Dirhagus pectinatus (new prov record) Epiphanis cornutus (new prov record) Hallomenus scapularis (new prov record) Carphacis nepigonensis (Bernhauer)-new Philonthus crestonensis (new prov) Phloeonomus lapponicus (Zetterstedt) Incisalia (Deciduphagus) augustinus Plebejus (Agriades) rusticus rusticus Plebejus (Plebejus) saepiolus amica Dioryctria abietivorella / reniculelloides Arthropod Species found in Northwest Alberta
* Note: NW Alberta inventory is incomplete. This list represents a start-point of some locally collected or documented occurrence data.
Impacts of Forestry Practices on Arthropod Diversity in Aspen Forests "Effects of Forestry Practices on Biodiversity of Litter-dwelling Beetles in the Aspen Forest"-John Spence (UofA), David Langor (ForCan) John Spence (UofA), David Langor (ForCan)Alberta Environment Research Trust, Forestry Canada, DMI, Can-Ab Partnership, Ab Forest Devel Research Trust Fund Arthropod Biodiversity From Populus spp. Coarse Woody Material in North-Central Alberta: a review of taxa & collection methods Early colonization of Populus wood by saproxylic beetles (Coleoptera)James Hammond & David Langor (Canadian Forest Service), John Spence (UofA) "Alberta Butterflies", The Provincial Museum of Alberta and CD Bird, GJ Hilchie, NG Kondla, EM Pike, FAH SperlingISBN 0-7732-1672-3 EMEND project: Shorthouse, D., Spence, J. "Boreal spiders as bioindicators of forest disturbance and management" + Shorthouse, David P. Editor. 2005. The Nearctic Spider Database. World Wide Web electronic publication.
http://canadianarachnology.webhop.net.
+ Some common spider names derived from http://www.spiderschool.info/families_of_spiders.htm (Hancock, John) "The Tiger Beetles of Alberta", John H. Acorn, University of Alberta Press "Damselflies of Alberta: flying neon toothpicks in the grass", John Acorn, University of Alberta Press Jacobs, 2004 Jacobs, J.M. 2004. Saproxylic beetle assemblages in the boreal mixedwood of Alberta: succession, wildfire and variable retention forestry. M.Sc. Thesis, University of Alberta. 124 p.
Spence Lab J. Spence. 2004. Unpublished data.
Lindo, Z. and S. Visser. 2004. Forest floor microarthropod aundance and oribatid mite (Acari: Orbatida) compositionfollowing partial and clear-cut harvesting in the mixedwood boreal forest. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 34:998-1006.
Smith, I.M., Lindquist, E.E., and V. Behan-Pelletier. 1998. Mites (Acari) in Smith, I.M., and G.G. Scudder, eds. Assessment ofspecies diversity in the Montane Cordillera Ecozone. Burlington: Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network, 1998.
Oribatid habitat association/hosts:http://www.naturewatch.ca/eman/reports/publications/99_montane/mites/mites04.html Jacobs, 2004 Jacobs, J.M. 2004. Saproxylic beetle assemblages in the boreal mixedwood of Alberta: succession, wildfire and variable retention forestry. M.Sc. Thesis, University of Alberta. 124 p.
Park, J. 2002. The Effects Of Resource Distribution And Spatial Scale On The Distribution Of Two Species Of Bark Beetle:Polygraphus rufipennis (Kirby) And Trypodendron lineatum (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). M.Sc. Thesis, U. of Calgary. 104 pp.
Morneau, Louis; MSc Thesis project: "Partial cutting impacts on moths and lepidopteran defoliators in a boreal mixedwood forestof Alberta" (EMEND UofA thesis project -Moths) Pinzon, Jaime and Spence, John. Composition and structure of epigeaic, understory and canopy spider assemblages in mixedwoodforest cover-types after variable retention harvest Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility website (Integrated Taxonomic Information System -ITIS)Species at Risk Act, Public Registry (federal website)Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Species at Risk Program (website)Alberta Endangered Species Conservation Committee (AESCC) -websiteCommittee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada -COSEWIC (website documents)Alberta Natural Heritage Information Centre (ANHIC) -Ab Community Development Dept. (website documents) The General Status of Alberta Wild Species (Alberta website) Gastropods of Northwest Alberta*
* Note: NW Alberta inventory is incomplete. This list represents a start-point of some locally collected data Gastropod Species found in Northwest Alberta
* Note: NW Alberta inventory is incomplete. This list represents a start-point of some locally collected or documented occurrence data.
2007 EMEND project: Suzanne Abele, S. Ellen Macdonald, John Spence. Gastropod diversity in boreal mixedwood forests of northwestern Alberta.
Birds of Northwest Alberta
Forest Biota within DMI Geographic AreasOrder SARA protects only east Canada population Wildlife Act 2005 -Special Concrn designation in-progress considered 'accidental/vagrant' in Alberta listed Ab=Sensitive, Wildlife Act 2005=Special Concern Wildlife Act 2005 -Special Concrn designation in-progress considered 'accidental/vagrant' in Alberta SARA=only east.Canada pop, Ab-sensitive + W. Act-SC SARA protects only strigata subspec (swBC) listed Ab=Sensitive, Wildlife Act 2005=Special Concern SARA protects only 'laingi' subspec (wBC) considered 'accidental/vagrant' in Alberta listed Ab=At-risk, Wildlife Act 2005=Threatened considered 'accidental/vagrant' in Alberta listed Ab=At-risk, Wildlife Act 2005=Threatened listed Ab=Sensitive, Wildlife Act 2005=Special Concern listed Ab=At-risk, Wildlife Act 2005=Endangered Blue font species are 'additions' to DMI's original "Biophysical Report 1999" listfrom a "Birds of Northern Alberta" compilation Bird species found in northwest Alberta and their conservation status as indicated in
Reference Sources:Original 1999 data compilation: Doug Collister + The Status of Alberta Wildlife (1996).
Fisher, C., Acorn, J. 1998. Birds of Alberta, Field Guide. Lone Pine Publishing. Edmonton, Alberta,CanadaSemenchuk, G. P., editor. 1993. The Atlas of Breeding Birds of Alberta. Federation of Alberta Naturalists. Edmonton, Ab, Canada McGillivray WB, Semenchuk GP, 1998. Field Guide to Alberta Birds. Federation of Alberta Naturalists Daishowa-Marubeni International Ltd., Fish and Wildlife Services. 1993.
-Habitat Requirements of 177 Forest Dwelling Wildlife Species on the DMI FMA. Peace River, Alberta, Canada Jul Wojnowski - Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory, Lesser Slave Lake Provincial Park, Slave Lake, AlbertaGlen Semenchuk - Federation of Alberta Naturalists, Edmonton, AlbertaBruce Harrison & Fiona Schmiegelow (Dept of Renewable Resources, AFHE Faculty, University of Alberta) -EMEND Project 2002 -Stand-level response of boreal forest songbirds to experimental partial-cut harvest in northwestern Alberta Species at Risk Act, Public Registry (federal website)Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Species at Risk Program (website)Alberta Endangered Species Conservation Committee (AESCC) -websiteCommittee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada -COSEWIC (website documents)The General Status of Alberta Wild Species (Alberta website) Trends in Relative Abundance of Bird Species
Systematic longterm (e.g., multi-decade) monitoring of the bird community does not exist in northwest Alberta.
Some temporal data, however, exists for migratory waterfowl as provided by joint monitoring by the Canadian and
U.S. federal governments and Ducks Unlimited (see section on migratory waterfowl). Citizen-based Christmas bird
counts provide local information that might be useful in detecting changes in populations of some winter resident
birds. The Atlas of Breeding Birds of Alberta (Semenchuk 1992) is the most detailed systematic assessment of
breeding birds in Alberta but can not be used to assess temporal changes as it has been conducted once.
From a continental, national, or provincial scale, however, the most expansive program is the North American
Breeding Bird Program (BBS) (Sauer, J. R., J. E. Hines, G. Gough, I. Thomas, and B. G. Peterjohn 1997). This
geographically extensive survey, which provides estimates of population change of songbirds, is based on visual and
acoustic counts of birds on over 3,500 routes surveyed in June throughout North America by experienced birders.
Unfortunately, this inventory program does not cover all of northwest Alberta. Notwithstanding, the BBS program
does allow us to examine relative changes in provincial population density of those bird species known to occur in
northwest Alberta. This information, in turn, can be used to assist forest companies in identifying bird species which
may be currently declining and therefore may require specific attention or management action. Table 25 provide
estimates of temporal trends in provincial bird species found in northwest Alberta. These data were used to create
graphics indicating those bird species whose relative abundance index from 1966–1996 is negative (<0%; Figure
34), slightly positive (0-3%; Figure 35) or moderately positive (>3%; Figure 36). Of the bird species monitored by
the BBS, 31 species exhibited a significant (p=0.05) increase in relative abundance whereas 15 species exhibited a
significant decline in relative abundance.
The findings of the BBS surveys may not accurately reflect bird abundances across the full spectrum of plant
communities as it is likely weighted towards those plant community types proximal to human settlements or those
found along the transportation networks. For example, the increasing abundance of cedar waxwings and merlins
shown in Alberta may partly reflect the plantings of mountain ash and spruce seedlings in towns and cities
throughout Alberta (Susan Hannon, personal communication). Mountain ash and spruce are important as forage and
nesting sites for waxwings and merlins, respectively. Despite the potential biases of this database, it is the best
available to examine temporal trends, and its biases are likely minor in relation to the composition, scope, and
sampling years of the BBS surveys.
Fishes of Northwest Alberta
Forest Aquatic Biota within DMI Geographic AreasOrder Commentsunofficially distinct from protected Salish Sucker (a BC Northern Squawfish (Pikeminnow) Ptychocheilus oregonensis listed Ab=Sensitive, Wildlife Act 2005=Special Concern debate re: northern Ab. Presencedebate re: northern Ab. Presence, Wildlife Act in-process Taxonomy of fish species found in northwest Alberta (56–60 °N, 114–120 °W)
and their conservation status as indicated in
Reference Sources:Nelson and Paetz, 1992. The Fishes of Alberta -2nd EditionSpecies at Risk Act, Public Registry (federal website)Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Species at Risk Program (website)Alberta Endangered Species Conservation Committee (AESCC) -websiteCommittee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada -COSEWIC (website documents)The General Status of Alberta Wild Species (Alberta website) Reptiles & Amphibians of Northwest Alberta
SARA protects only east Canada + south mtn pop's listed Ab=Sensitive, Wildlife Act 2005=Special Concern listed Ab=At-risk, Wildlife Act 2005=Threatened historical sightings Hines Creek/Fairview areas Amphibians and Reptiles
Species Richness
Species richness of amphibians is low in northwest Alberta but comparable to most of the province. The
mixedwood boreal forest contains an abundance of small water bodies with riparian vegetation and changing water
levels that provide good breeding and molting habitat for amphibians, and the same areas provide good breeding
habitat for the many insects on which amphibians feed. The Peace River is also an important distribution route for
amphibians (Roberts et al. 1987). However, the boreal forest generally lacks the hot, dry environment that is
preferred by most reptiles; consequently, only two species (both garter snakes) are found. The red-sided
garter snake is particularly abundant along the Peace River where there is good overwintering habitat and abundant
amphibians, a preferred food (Roberts et al. 1987). Species richness of amphibians and reptiles in northwest Alberta
is summarized.
Special Concerns
According to various species designation sources, a number of herptile species are currently considered sensitive or
otherwise at-risk.
Amphibian and reptile species found in northwest Alberta and their conservation status as indicated in 2000 "The Amphibians and Reptiles of Alberta -A field guide and primer of boreal herpetology" Anthony P. Russell & Aaron M. BauerISBN 1-55238-038-6 2000 General Status of Alberta Wild Species Species at Risk Act, Public Registry (federal website)Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Species at Risk Program (website)Alberta Endangered Species Conservation Committee (AESCC) -websiteCommittee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada -COSEWIC (website documents)Kendell, Kris, Alberta Conservation Association, Biodiversity Species at Risk Business Unit (AVAMProgram)Dr. Brian Eaton, Alberta Research Council, Aquatic Ecologist, Integrated Resource Mgt, Sustainable EcosystemsThe General Status of Alberta Wild Species (Alberta website) Mammals of Northwest Alberta
Considered "Exotic/alien" in Alberta Ab Wildlife Act 2005 in-process Threatened status SARA protects only 'haidarum' (wBC) subsp sightings Peace River area noted since 2000 listed Ab=At-risk, Wildlife Act 2005=Threatened listed Ab=At-risk, Wildlife Act 2005=Endangered* * -Ab notes: this rating applies to specific geog boundary regulation description Mammal species found in northwest Alberta and their conservation status as indicated in:
2000 General Status of Alberta Wild Species2003 Patriquin K.J., Barclay R.M., "Foraging by bats in cleared, thinned and unharvested boreal forest" Journal of Applied Ecology 2003, 40, 646-657 (EMEND related research project) Stelfox JB, 1993. Hoofed Mammals of Alberta, Lone Pine PublishingSmith HC, 1993. Alberta Mammals -An Atlas and Guide, Provincial Museum of AlbertaSpecies at Risk Act, Public Registry (federal website)Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Species at Risk Program (website)Alberta Endangered Species Conservation Committee (AESCC) -websiteCommittee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada -COSEWIC (website documents)The General Status of Alberta Wild Species (Alberta website) Non-Vascular Plants of Northwest Alberta* (Lichens)
Forest Biota within DMI Geographic Areas
(Note: NW Alberta inventory may be incomplete) Blue italics - denote additional species discovery at EMEND Lichen Species found in Northwest Alberta
For non-vascular plants, verifiable common names are generally not available (Vitt et al. 1988). Both of thechecklists for the mosses and the lichens only list species by their latin binomer. Bryophyte taxonomists are havingenough trouble ensuring consistency in the genus and species descriptions, let alone common names.
The field guides do give common names for the nonvascular plants, which were included in the list, but these namesare not verifiable. They are also not consistent between field guides.
If a moss or lichen species without a common name was found, one was assigned to it based on familiar species. Ifthere were other species from the same genera with a common name in the list, the root of the common name wasassigned to the unnamed species. If the unnamed species was the solitary species representing its genera, the genusname was assigned as the common name.
Common names in brackets generally refer to the genus and is used for those species where no common vernacularexists.
Assignment of Common NamesCommon names for the vascular plants were taken from either the field guides listed in the bibliography, or from theAlberta Plant and Fungi Master Checklist. If the common names conflicted between the sources, both were listed.
Lichen species found in northwest Alberta and their conservation status as indicated in:
References Used for original 1999 compilation:Ealey, David M. Editor. 1993 Alberta Plants and Fungi, Master Species list and Species group Checklists. Alberta Esslinger, T.L and Egan, R.S. 1995 “A Sixth checklist of the lichen forming, lichenicolous and allied fungi of the continental United States and Canada.” ; Bryologist 98(4): 467-549.
Ireland, Robert. R. 1980 Checklist of the Mosses of Canada. National museum of natural science, publications in botany no. 8. Natural Museums of Canada, Ottawa.
Johnson, D., Kershaw, L., MacKinnon, A and Pojar, J. 1995. Plants of the Western Boreal Forest and Aspen Parkland.
Lonepine Publishing and the Canadian Forest Service.
MacKinnon, A., Pojar, J and Coupe, R. 1992. Plants of Northern British Columbia. Lonepine Publishing and B.C Moss, E.H and Packer, J.G. 1983. Flora of Alberta, Second Edition. University of Toronto Press. Toronto.
Vitt, D., Marshey, J. and Bovey, R. 1988. Mosses, Lichens and Ferns of Northwest North America. Lonepine Packer and Bradley (1984) -additional rare species in the northwest region Additional ReferencesEMEND (Ecosystem Management Emulating Natural Disturbances) projects Derek Johnson (Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Edmonton, Alberta)Ellen MacDonald (Dept of Renewable Resources, AFHE Faculty, University of Alberta) 1998 -Understory Vascular Plant Regeneration with Reference to Site Conditions (before and) Following Disturbance Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility website (Integrated Taxonomic Information System -ITIS)Species at Risk Act, Public Registry (federal website)Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Species at Risk Program (website)Alberta Endangered Species Conservation Committee (AESCC) -websiteCommittee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada -COSEWIC (website documents)Alberta Natural Heritage Information Centre (ANHIC) -Ab Community Development Dept. (website documents) (tracking and watch lists, plant community tracking list, status rankings) The General Status of Alberta Wild Species (Alberta website) Non-Vascular Plants of Northwest Alberta* (Mosses & Liverworts)
Forest Biota within DMI Geographic Areas
(Note: NW Alberta inventory may be incomplete) Amblystegium serpens (Hedw.) Schimp.
Amblystegium varium (Hedw.) Lindb.
Anastrophyllum hellerianum (Nees) Schust.
Blepharostoma trichophyllum (L.) Dum.
Brachythecium albicans (Hedw.) Schimp.
Brachythecium campestre (C. Müll.) Jaeg.
Brachythecium erythrorrhizon Schimp.
Brachythecium reflexum (Stark) Schimp.
Brachythecium starkei (Brid.) Schimp.
Brachythecium velutinum (Hedw.) Schimp.
Bryohaplocladium microphyllum (Hedw.) Wat. & Iwats.
Bryum lisae De Not. var. cuspidatum (Bruch & Schimp.) Marg.
Calliergon cordifolium (Hedw.) Kindb.
Calliergon richardsonii (Mitt.) Kindb.
Campylium hispidulum (Brid.) Mitt.
Cephalozia lunulifolia (Dum.) Dum.
Dicranum acutifolium (Lindb. & Arnell) Weinm.
Dicranum fragilifolium Lindb.
Common Hook Moss, Clawleaved Feather Moss Herzogiella turfacea (Lindb.) Iwats.
Isopterygiopsis pulchella (Hedw.) Schimp. Iwats.
Jamesoniella autumnalis (DC.) Steph.
Leptodictyum riparium (Hedw.) Warnst.
Lophocolea heterophylla (Schrad.) Dum.
Lophozia ascendens (Warnst.) Schust. Lophozia guttulata (Lindb. Et H.Arnell) Evans Mnium spinulosum Bruch & Schimp.
Oncophorus wahlenbergii Brid. Orthotrichum elegans Hook. & Grev.
Plagiochila porelloides (Nees) Lindenb.
Plagiomnium drummondii (Bruch & Schimp.) T. Kop.
Plagiomnium ellipticum (Brid.) T. Kop.
Pseudotaxiphyllum elegans (Brid.) Iwats.
Rhizomnium pseudopunctatum (Bruch & Schimp.) T. Kop.
Scapania glaucocephala (Tayl.) Aust.
White-toothed Peat Moss (Girgensohn's Moss) Tritomaria exsectiformis (Breidl.) Loeske Blue italics - denote additional species discovery at EMEND Mosses and Liverwort Species found in Northwest Alberta
Moss/liverwort species found in northwest Alberta and their conservation status as indicated in:
For non-vascular plants, verifiable common names are generally not available (Vitt et al. 1988). Both of the
checklists for the mosses and the lichens only list species by their latin binomer. Bryophyte taxonomists are having
enough trouble ensuring consistency in the genus and species descriptions, let alone common names.
The field guides do give common names for the nonvascular plants, which were included in the list, but these names
are not verifiable. They are also not consistent between field guides.
If a moss or lichen species without a common name was found, one was assigned to it based on familiar species. If
there were other species from the same genera with a common name in the list, the root of the common name was
assigned to the unnamed species. If the unnamed species was the solitary species representing its genera, the genus
name was assigned as the common name.
Common names in brackets generally refer to the genus and is used for those species where no common vernacular
exists.
Assignment of Common NamesCommon names for the vascular plants were taken from either the field guides listed in the bibliography, or from theAlberta Plant and Fungi Master Checklist. If the common names conflicted between the sources, both were listed.
References Used for original 1999 compilation:Ealey, David M. Editor. 1993 Alberta Plants and Fungi, Master Species list and Species group Checklists. Alberta Esslinger, T.L and Egan, R.S. 1995 “A Sixth checklist of the lichen forming, lichenicolous and allied fungi of the continental United States and Canada.” ; Bryologist 98(4): 467-549.
Ireland, Robert. R. 1980 Checklist of the Mosses of Canada. National museum of natural science, publications in botany no. 8. Natural Museums of Canada, Ottawa.
Johnson, D., Kershaw, L., MacKinnon, A and Pojar, J. 1995. Plants of the Western Boreal Forest and Aspen Parkland.
Lonepine Publishing and the Canadian Forest Service.
MacKinnon, A., Pojar, J and Coupe, R. 1992. Plants of Northern British Columbia. Lonepine Publishing and B.C Moss, E.H and Packer, J.G. 1983. Flora of Alberta, Second Edition. University of Toronto Press. Toronto.
Vitt, D., Marshey, J. and Bovey, R. 1988. Mosses, Lichens and Ferns of Northwest North America. Lonepine Packer and Bradley (1984) -additional rare species in the northwest region Additional ReferencesEMEND (Ecosystem Management Emulating Natural Disturbances) projects Derek Johnson (Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Edmonton, Alberta)Ellen MacDonald (Dept of Renewable Resources, AFHE Faculty, University of Alberta) 1998 -Understory Vascular Plant Regeneration with Reference to Site Conditions (before and) Following Disturbance Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility website (Integrated Taxonomic Information System -ITIS)Species at Risk Act, Public Registry (federal website)Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Species at Risk Program (website)Alberta Endangered Species Conservation Committee (AESCC) -websiteCommittee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada -COSEWIC (website documents)Alberta Natural Heritage Information Centre (ANHIC) -Ab Community Development Dept. (website documents) (tracking and watch lists, plant community tracking list, status rankings) The General Status of Alberta Wild Species (Alberta website) Vascular Plants of Northwest Alberta*
(Note: NW Alberta inventory may be incomplete) SARA addresses only 'megacephalum' var.
Fragrant Cliff Wood Fern (Fragrant Shield) SARA addresses only 'provancheri' var.
Blue italics - denote additional species discovery at EMENDDark red italics - denote additional species discovery by ABMP Vascular Plant Species found in Northwest Alberta
Assignment of Plant Growth Form (type)Aquatic: A plant growing in water with no rigid support tissue or well developed root mass. Technically, aquatics are forbs.
Herbaceous annual or perennial, possibly in an amphibious habitat.
Dwarf shrub: Shrubs with an average growth of under .5 m, or a perennial with a partially woody stem.
Succulant: Used to describe the one rare cactus in the list.
Any member of the Cyperaceae family.
A woody plant greater than .5 m in height, with multiple stems at the origin.
A woody plant with a solitary, possibly branching stem.
Assignment of Common NamesCommon names for the vascular plants were taken from either the field guides listed in the bibliography, or from theAlberta Plant and Fungi Master Checklist. If the common names conflicted between the sources, both were listed.
Vascular plant species found in northwest Alberta and their conservation status as indicated in:
References Used for original 1999 compilation:Ealey, David M. Editor. 1993 Alberta Plants and Fungi, Master Species list and Species group Checklists. Alberta Esslinger, T.L and Egan, R.S. 1995 “A Sixth checklist of the lichen forming, lichenicolous and allied fungi of the continental United States and Canada.” ; Bryologist 98(4): 467-549.
Ireland, Robert. R. 1980 Checklist of the Mosses of Canada. National museum of natural science, publications in botany no. 8. Natural Museums of Canada, Ottawa.
Johnson, D., Kershaw, L., MacKinnon, A and Pojar, J. 1995. Plants of the Western Boreal Forest and Aspen Parkland.
Lonepine Publishing and the Canadian Forest Service.
MacKinnon, A., Pojar, J and Coupe, R. 1992. Plants of Northern British Columbia. Lonepine Publishing and B.C Moss, E.H and Packer, J.G. 1983. Flora of Alberta, Second Edition. University of Toronto Press. Toronto.
Vitt, D., Marshey, J. and Bovey, R. 1988. Mosses, Lichens and Ferns of Northwest North America. Lonepine Packer and Bradley (1984) -additional rare species in the northwest region Additional ReferencesEMEND (Ecosystem Management Emulating Natural Disturbances) projects Derek Johnson (Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Edmonton, Alberta)Ellen MacDonald (Dept of Renewable Resources, AFHE Faculty, University of Alberta) 1998 -Understory Vascular Plant Regeneration with Reference to Site Conditions (before and) Following Disturbance Canadian Biodiversity Information Facility website (Integrated Taxonomic Information System -ITIS)Kershaw L, Gould J, Johnson D, Lancaster J,. 2001. Rare Vascular Plants of Alberta (Ab Native Plant Council) The University of Alberta Press, Canadian Forest Service Species at Risk Act, Public Registry (federal website)Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Species at Risk Program (website)Alberta Endangered Species Conservation Committee (AESCC) -websiteCommittee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada -COSEWIC (website documents)Alberta Natural Heritage Information Centre (ANHIC) -Ab Community Development Dept. (website documents) (tracking and watch lists, plant community tracking list, status rankings) ABMP -Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Program -regional plot observations (DMI-tenure relevant)The General Status of Alberta Wild Species (Alberta website) Fungi Species of Northwest Alberta*
(Note: NW Alberta inventory is incomplete) Armillaria spinapina (Bérubé and Dessureault) Bjerkandera adusta (Willdenow : Fries) P. Karsten Bjerkandera fumosa (Persoon : Fries) P. Karsten Cerrena unicolor (Bulliard : Fries) Murril Chondrostereum purpureum (Persoon : Fries) Pouzar Crepidotus mollis (Schaeffer : Fr.) Staude Cylindrobasidium evolvens (Fries) Jülich W.
Diplomitoporus crustulinus (Bres.) Doma?ski Fomitopsis pinicola (Swartz : Fries) P. Karsten Funalia trogii (Berkeley in Trog) Bondarzew and Singer Fuscoporia ferruginosa (Schrader : Fries) Murrill Ganoderma applanatum (Persoon) Patouillard Gloeophyllum saepiarium (Wulfen : Fries) P. Karsten Gloeophyllum trabeum (Persoon : Fries) Murrill Hypoxylon fragiforme (Persoon : Fries) Kickx Peniophora polygonia (Fries) Bourdot and Galzin Phellinus laevigatus (Fries) Bourdot and Galzin Phellinus tremulae (Bondartzev) Bondartzev and Borisov Pseudochaete tabacina (Sowerby : Fries) Léveillé Skeletocutis amorpha (Fries) Kotlaba and Pouzar Stereum hirsutum (Willdenow : Fries) Gray Stereum ochraceo-flavum (Schweinitz) Ellis Stereum sanguinolentum (Albertini and Schweinitz) Fries Trametes ochracea (Persoon) Gilbertson and Ryvarden Trametes pubescens (Schumaker : Fries) Pilat Trametes versicolor (Linnaeus : Fries) Pilat Trichaptum abietinum (Dickson: Fries) Ryvarden Trichaptum subchartaceum (Murrill) Ryvarden Xeromphalina campanella (Batsch : Fries) Kühner & Maire Fungi Species found in Northwest Alberta
2000 Lisa Cuthbertson, Ken Mallet, Elllen MacDonald, Jacqueline Polland. Spatial patterns of Armillaria.
2006 EMEND Project: Nicolas Debaive, John Spence. Effects of Natural Disturbances on Polypore Diversity.

Source: http://www.dmi.ca/about_dmi/dmi_in_alberta/prpd/detailed_forest_management_plans/documents/DMI_Taxonomic_Summary_2008_(inventory_list_of_NW_Alberta_species).pdf

Microsoft word - dect beitrag f.rth 10-2005.doc

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